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Personal System of Discipline

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Title



Building Classroom Discipline encourages you to explore your philosophical, theoretical, and practical views on discipline so that you can articulate your own approach to discipline. A philosophy of discipline includes a critical analysis of fundamental assumptions and beliefs. Selected theories or models will support those beliefs. You will want the actions you use to encourage self-discipline to align with your philosophy and related theories. Creating questions about these three components (philosophy, theory, and practice) can get you started with developing your Personal System of Discipline.

Essential questions (Wiggens, G. and McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design [2nd ed.]. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.) help to clarify the critical content/concepts of curricula and classroom climate. They are used here to encourage reflection on clarifying and planning ways to develop a Personal System of Discipline or positive learning environments/communities. Essential questions have the following characteristics:

  1. Can and should be asked over and over again.
  2. Are linked to key “habits of mind”
  3. Go to the heart of the matter
  4. Recur naturally throughout ones learning and over the course of time
  5. Raise other important (“big picture”) issues
Essential questions are not:
  1. Leading questions
  2. Checking for factual knowledge

Some essential questions for creating your Personal System of Discipline are provided to encourage you to develop your own specific important questions that will guide development of the System. Early in your study of Building Classroom Discipline, reflect on what your own essential questions are in relation to philosophy, theory, and practice for developing a positive classroom learning community. The questions will be revised as you investigate and learn more and that is to be expected. Your Personal System will develop and change over time.




Clarifying Your Philosophy of Discipline



Essential Questions (Charles, 9th ed. [2007]. Page 267):

  1. What is classroom misbehavior and why does it require attention?
  2. What is the purpose of discipline and what results do we want to achieve?
  3. ?
  4. ?

After you have written your essential questions, write philosophical ideas from each of the chapters that help to answer the questions and that you want to apply to your Personal System.


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 1. Classroom Discipline


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 2. Inclusion


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 3. Neurological Based Behavior


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 4. Twentieth-Century Pioneers


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 5. Three Bridges to 21st Century Discipline


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 6. Belonging, Cooperation, and Self-Control


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 7. Active Student Involvement


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 8. Pragmatic Classroom Management


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 9. Same-Side Win-Win Strategies


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 10. Dignity and Hope for Challenging Youth


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 11. Self-Restitution and Moral Intelligence


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 12. Raising Student Responsibility


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 13. Careful Teacher Guidance and Instruction


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 14. Synergy and Reducing Causes of Misbehavior


Philosophical Ideas Chapter 15. Formalizing your Personal System of Discipline





Clarifying Your Theory of Discipline




Essential Questions (Charles, 9th ed. [2007]. Page 267):

  1. What are essential components of a good discipline system?
  2. How do those components work together or influence each other?
  3. What makes you believe those components will produce the results you desire?
  4. ?
  5. ?

After you have written your essential questions, write theoretical ideas from each of the chapters that help to answer the questions and that you want to apply to your Personal System.


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 1. Classroom Discipline


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 2. Inclusion


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 3. Neurological Based Behavior


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 4. Twentieth-Century Pioneers


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 5. Three Bridges to 21st Century Discipline


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 6. Belonging, Cooperation, and Self-Control


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 7. Active Student Involvement


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 8. Pragmatic Classroom Management


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 9. Same-Side Win-Win Strategies


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 10. Dignity and Hope for Challenging Youth


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 11. Self-Restitution and Moral Intelligence


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 12. Raising Student Responsibility


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 13. Careful Teacher Guidance and Instruction


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 14. Synergy and Reducing Causes of Misbehavior


Theoretical Ideas Chapter 15. Formalizing your Personal System of Discipline





Clarifying Your Practice of Discipline



Essential Questions (Charles, 9th ed. [2007]. Page 268):

  1. What will you do to prevent or limit the occurrence of misbehavior?
  2. How can you react most effectively when students misbehave?
  3. How will you help students to actually want to behave more responsibly?
  4. ?
  5. ?

After you have written your essential questions, write practice ideas from each of the chapters that help to answer the questions and that you want to apply to your Personal System.


Practice Ideas Chapter 1. Classroom Discipline


Practice Ideas Chapter 2. Inclusion


Practice Ideas Chapter 3. Neurological Based Behavior


Practice Ideas Chapter 4. Twentieth-Century Pioneers


Practice Ideas Chapter 5. Three Bridges to 21st Century Discipline


Practice Ideas Chapter 6. Belonging, Cooperation, and Self-Control


Practice Ideas Chapter 7. Active Student Involvement


Practice Ideas Chapter 8. Pragmatic Classroom Management


Practice Ideas Chapter 9. Same-Side Win-Win Strategies


Practice Ideas Chapter 10. Dignity and Hope for Challenging Youth


Practice Ideas Chapter 11. Self-Restitution and Moral Intelligence


Practice Ideas Chapter 12. Raising Student Responsibility


Practice Ideas Chapter 13. Careful Teacher Guidance and Instruction


Practice Ideas Chapter 14. Synergy and Reducing Causes of Misbehavior


Practice Ideas Chapter 15. Formalizing your Personal System of Discipline






Five Principles for Practicing your Personal System of Discipline



Regularly reflect and write about ideas that you intend to include in your Personal System of Discipline.




Principle 1. Present and lead a professional life.






Principle 2. Clarify desired interactions among students.






Principle 3. Create and maintain positive learning communities.






Principle 4. Guide students to be respectful and responsible.






Principle 5. Respond to disruptive and serious issues.